Social Studies

  • African-American History

    Grades 10-12

    1/2 unit of credit  

    Come explore African-American History through stories, music, the arts and culture. During this course, students will learn about the African American experience from 1500s to the present. Major topics will include life during the Civil War, reconstruction, late 19th century, early 20th century, WWI and the 1920s, the Great Depression, culture in the 1930s and 1940s, WWII, the Freedom Movement, African Americans in the new, millennium, and current events.

    Session 1, seated, 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

     


  • American Baseball History

    Grades 10-12

    1/2 unit of credit

    This course surveys and interprets the history of baseball in the United States. Major topics studied are “Origins of Sport”, “Professionalism and the National Pastime”, “Troubles of Big Business”, “Baseball and America from the Progressive Era through the 1920s”, “Baseball, the Great Depression, and World War II”, “Baseball and the African American Experience,” “Baseball and Post War America: 1950s-1960s,” and “Baseball and America in the 1970s and 1980s.”

    The course deals with both the role and significance of baseball in American society over the past 150 years and with the history of the game itself. 

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • American Civil War

    Grades 10-12

    1/2 unit of credit

    This course covers the American Civil War era from the earliest seeds of disunion at the Constitutional Convention to the end of Reconstruction. Particular attention will be given to events that unfolded in Missouri, the Ozarks, and the Trans-Mississippi Theater and their subsequent results. The strands of the K-12 Social Studies Curriculum, economics, government, geography, multicultural and current perspectives and citizenship will be utilized to understand this period of history.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • Economics

    Grades 11-12

    1/2 unit of credit

    This course presents the philosophy and principles of economic concepts. It consists of a study of the nature and method of economics; opportunity cost; business organization, supply and demand; the market system and competitive enterprise; money, banking and monetary policy; resource allocation; and international economics. This course is designed to cross subject area lines when appropriate in order to give the student a broad view of concepts under investigation. This is a weighted course. Students will be expected to complete assignments outside of class time on a regular basis. Students will be expected to complete projects that must include the elements of research, exploration and evaluation. All students in this course are expected to read extensively, think critically and write lucidly. 

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • Liberty and Law

    Grades 11-12

    1/2 unit of credit

    Available for credit recovery.

    This course is designed to be the culminating experience in the student's required social studies program bringing together and expanding the knowledge from prior study of the following areas:  citizenship, current events, multicultural perspectives, history, geography, economics, and government.  The student will be expected to demonstrate, through examination, understanding the basic provisions and principles of The Constitution of the United States and of the State of Missouri as prescribed by state statute.

    Session 1, seated, 8 a.m. - 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. -  2:30 p.m.

    Session 2, seated 7:40 - 11:12 a.m. or 11:37 a.m. - 3:09 p.m.

    Session 1 or 2, online

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • Liberty and Law Honors

    Grades 11-12

    1/2 unit of credit

    This course is designed to meet the needs of juniors and seniors to become informed and active adult citizens. The major topics covered include introduction to government, Federal Legislative Branch, Federal Executive Branch, Federal Judicial Branch, political parties, electoral processes and voting, state and local government, comparative government and U.S. Foreign Policy. There will be considerable emphasis on learning activities requiring writing, critical thinking, using primary sources, making inferences, generalizing, and drawing conclusions. Students will be expected to read extensively beyond the assigned textbook and routinely undertake independent research projects. Students will be expected to demonstrate, through examination, their knowledge and understanding of the basic provisions and principles of the Constitution of the United States and the State of Missouri as prescribed by state law.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • Psychology

    Grades 11-12

    1/2 unit of credit 

    Available for credit recovery.

    This psychology survey course is designed to help each student gain insight into human behavior. Students will also identify current events and issues in psychology on a regular basis. 

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 4 weeks)


  • Psychology of the Holocaust

    Grades 11-12

    1 unit of credit 

    The unique historic events that have come to be known as the Holocaust will be used as a vehicle to analyze and explore psychological concepts such as attitude formation, personality development, discrimination, the bystander effect, learned behavior, motivation and multiple aspects of both individual and group behavior. This course will examine how diverse forms of individual and social behavior can exist in the midst of a dysfunctional social order like that of Germany prior to and during the Holocaust, as well as explore other acts of genocide.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1 credit is 4 weeks)


  • U.S. History

    Grade 9

    1 unit of credit 

    Available for credit recovery.

    GHS freshmen:  This course will be part of your Freshman Academy experience in the fall and should not be part of your summer schedule.

    Required of all students, this course is a survey of U.S. history since Reconstruction. It will examine and evaluate matters relating to the student’s role as a citizen in an ever-changing, multicultural world and focus on social, political, economic, and military events which have a major impact on shaping the Unites States as it is today.

    Session 1, seated, 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

    Session 2, seated, 7:40 a.m. - 3:09 p.m.

    Session 1 & 2, online

    (1/2 credit is 2 weeks)


  • U.S. History Honors

    Grade 9

    1 unit of credit 

    GHS freshmen:  This course will be part of your Freshman Academy experience in the fall and should not be part of your summer schedule.

    This United States History course is a survey of U.S. history since Reconstruction. Students will be given the opportunity to become involved in rigorous learning activities requiring critical thinking, library research, writing, making inferences, generalizing, and drawing conclusions. Major social, political, economic, and military events and themes of United States history since Reconstruction will be explored. Students will be expected to read extensively and routinely undertake independent research projects.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 2 weeks)


  • World Geography

    Grade 9-12

    1/2 unit of credit 

    Available for credit recovery.

    This course is a study of people, places and environment from a physical and cultural perspective. Through a variety of classroom activities, students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the interdependent world in which they live.  Students will analyze and evaluate the connection between their local and global communities. This course emphasizes the practical and responsible application of geography to life situations.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (2 weeks faster pace or 4 weeks slower pace) 


  • World History

    Grades 10-12

    1 unit of credit 

    Available for credit recovery.

    This course is a survey of world history and cultures of the world with an emphasis on the Modern Era from the Renaissance to the present. The focus of the course is the major ideas, people and events from the eastern and western hemispheres that shape our world today. Major units include renaissance and reformation, non-European civilizations, imperialism, and 20th-century topics for research.

    Session 1, seated, 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

    Session 2, seated, 7:40 a.m. - 3:09 p.m.

    Session 1 or 2, online (1/2 credit is 2 weeks)


  • World History Honors

    Grades 10-12

    1 unit of credit 

    This course is a survey of world history and cultures with an emphasis on the Modern Era from Renaissance to the present. The focus of the course is the major ideas, people and events from the eastern and western hemispheres which have shaped our world today. Major themes include but are not limited to Global Exchange, Age of Discovery, Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Revolution, and how they have impacted the Modern Era. Students will be given the opportunity to become involved in rigorous learning and writing requiring critical thinking activities, research, making inferences, generalizing and drawing conclusions. Students will be expected to read extensively and routinely undertake independent research projects.

    Session 1 or 2, online only

    (1/2 credit is 2 weeks)